Discussion:
A report from Andalucia, July 2017
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Simon Laub
2017-07-10 14:54:45 UTC
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Have just returned from a trip to Andalucia.
Lots of impressions to pass on, but, sadly, not much activity
in rec.travel.european these days? I.e. not that many
to pass the story on to?
Nevertheless, I'll give it a go:

Shortly: Andalucia has certainly been influenced
by a lot of people over the centuries.
From roman emperors, onwards to muslim caliphates,
followed by Viking raids (Vikings who later settle in the
area, selling cheese) and forward to Spanish kings,
who started expeditions to the rest of the world from
the Andalician heartland.
Between all the wars you certainly don't get the impression
that the past was such a glorious time of stability
that you sometimes see it portrayed as in the media ...

But, well, the land is still there.
And well worth a visit.

You can see some pictures from my trip here:
http://www.simonlaub.net/Fortunecity/Andalucia2017/index.html

best wishes
-Simon
poldy
2017-07-10 19:46:56 UTC
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Post by Simon Laub
Have just returned from a trip to Andalucia.
Lots of impressions to pass on, but, sadly, not much activity
in rec.travel.european these days? I.e. not that many
to pass the story on to?
Shortly: Andalucia has certainly been influenced
by a lot of people over the centuries.
From roman emperors, onwards to muslim caliphates,
followed by Viking raids (Vikings who later settle in the
area, selling cheese) and forward to Spanish kings,
who started expeditions to the rest of the world from
the Andalician heartland.
Between all the wars you certainly don't get the impression
that the past was such a glorious time of stability
that you sometimes see it portrayed as in the media ...
But, well, the land is still there.
And well worth a visit.
http://www.simonlaub.net/Fortunecity/Andalucia2017/index.html
best wishes
-Simon
When I think of Andalucia, I remember the story about the Puerto del
Suspiro del Moro, the way the sultan left Granada after being kicked out.

Then of course there's the Ponte dei Sospiri in Venice.

Different kind of sigh but interesting that two different places evoked
similar responses.
--
Serenity Now!
Ken Blake
2017-07-10 20:27:43 UTC
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Post by poldy
When I think of Andalucia, I remember the story about the Puerto del
Suspiro del Moro, the way the sultan left Granada after being kicked out.
Then of course there's the Ponte dei Sospiri in Venice.
Different kind of sigh but interesting that two different places evoked
similar responses.
A pretty similar kind of sigh. The Ponte dei Sospiri is a bridge
connecting the Palazzo Dogale with the prison cells. It's not called
the "bridge of sighs" because of any sighs of people sighing when
looking at it from the outside.It has a small window in it, and
prisoners were said to sigh as they crossed the bridge, looked out the
window, and saw their last glimpse of daylight before being locked up.
Paul Aubrin
2017-07-16 06:07:24 UTC
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Post by Simon Laub
Have just returned from a trip to Andalucia.
Lots of impressions to pass on, but, sadly, not much activity in
rec.travel.european these days? I.e. not that many to pass the story on
to?
Shortly: Andalucia has certainly been influenced by a lot of people over
the centuries.
From roman emperors, onwards to muslim caliphates,
followed by Viking raids (Vikings who later settle in the area, selling
cheese) and forward to Spanish kings,
who started expeditions to the rest of the world from the Andalician
heartland.
Between all the wars you certainly don't get the impression that the
past was such a glorious time of stability that you sometimes see it
portrayed as in the media ...
But, well, the land is still there.
And well worth a visit.
http://www.simonlaub.net/Fortunecity/Andalucia2017/index.html
best wishes -Simon
Andaluces de Jaen

Miguel Hernandez 1937
Paco Ibanez.

Another version.


Andaluces de Jaén,
aceituneros altivos,
decidme en el alma: ¿quién,
quién levantó los olivos?

No los levantó la nada,
ni el dinero, ni el señor,
sino la tierra callada,
el trabajo y el sudor.

Unidos al agua pura
y a los planetas unidos,
los tres dieron la hermosura
de los troncos retorcidos.

Levántate, olivo cano,
dijeron al pie del viento.
Y el olivo alzó una mano
poderosa de cimiento.

Andaluces de Jaén,
aceituneros altivos,
decidme en el alma: ¿quién
amamantó los olivos?

Vuestra sangre, vuestra vida,
no la del explotador
que se enriqueció en la herida
generosa del sudor.

No la del terrateniente
que os sepultó en la pobreza,
que os pisoteó la frente,
que os redujo la cabeza.

Árboles que vuestro afán
consagró al centro del día
eran principio de un pan
que sólo el otro comía.

¡Cuántos siglos de aceituna,
los pies y las manos presos,
sol a sol y luna a luna,
pesan sobre vuestros huesos!

Andaluces de Jaén,
aceituneros altivos,
pregunta mi alma: ¿de quién,
de quién son estos olivos?

Jaén, levántate brava
sobre tus piedras lunares,
no vayas a ser esclava
con todos tus olivares.

Dentro de la claridad
del aceite y sus aromas,
indican tu libertad
la libertad de tus lomas.

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