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Astonishing questions about the failed coup attempt in Turkey
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v***@yahoo.com
2016-07-25 00:20:41 UTC
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I really want to know who is bull-shitting who!!!

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http://hizmetnews.com/18473/astonishing-questions-failed-coup-attempt-turkey/#.V5VT4mZTE2M

Astonishing questions about the failed coup attempt in Turkey

Date posted: July 23, 2016

Many people watching the stunning events in Turkey believe that the coup attempt was nothing but a pure ‘theater.’

The leader of the coup was a pro-Erdogan General Mehmet Disli, brother of AKP deputy Saban Disli, who defines himself as Erdogan’s confidante.

The poorly-planned coup attempt has started with the capture of Istanbul’s Bosporus Bridge. Only one-way traffic was blocked. The other, was wide open.

Unlike all other military coups in Turkish history, this attempt was initiated at 10 pm when all the country was still awake. Why?

Why did the coup-plotters not attempt to silence the pro-government media and instead took over the least-watched state TV broadcaster, TRT, allowing their targets to regroup and use more popular channels?

Why did they not cut off the Internet connection and let the current government to use social media effectively to challenge the coup attempt?

Often-blocked Internet communication was permitted this time

Why was no single politician, including the president and the prime minister were taken into custody? Why did the coup plotters not even to capture any politicians?

President Erdogan was neither in Ankara nor Istanbul but instead spending his vacation in the Mediterranean seaside. Why did the coup plotters not move to detain him while he was there?

In fact, 25 soldiers in helicopters descended on a hotel in Marmaris on ropes, shooting, just after Erdogan had left in an apparent attempt to seize him. Why did they wait for two hours to go after him?

Erdogan could safely fly from Marmaris to Istanbul over an hour, while rebel F-16 planes were patrolling the skies and flying low over cities.

Calling the coup attempt on his regime a “gift from the God” President Erdogan has already dismissed more than 60,000 civil servants, 6,000 judges and military officers, 1577 faculty deans from universities.

Critics claim that this failed coup attempt was simply a pretext to legitimize arbitrary authoritarian practices, eliminate all the dissent while filling the state apparatus with staunch supporters, and start an ethnic cleansing against sympathizers of the Gulen movement and Alawites.
v***@yahoo.com
2016-07-25 00:21:24 UTC
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http://hizmetnews.com/18408/gulen-factor-erdogan-coup-united-states/#.V5VVFWZTE2M

The Gülen Factor: Erdogan, the Coup, and the United States

Date posted: July 20, 2016

BINOY KAMPMARK

Engaged in his dirty spate of housecleaning under the auspices of protecting the constitution and the Turkish state, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan continues to insist on one vital scalp in his enterprise.

Thus far, the cleric Fethullah Gülen has eluded Ankara from his abode in Pennsylvania. From his base, something of a global network has been constructed, one discernable through foundations and an assortment of endeavours pursued under the guise of a faith movement. These do not attest to the spirit of a pacifist warrior, averse to revolution. They suggest influence, and the markings of power.

For the cleric’s enemies, there is much to be said that he has profited from the land of the free, seething about an individual he once desired to share power with. Notions of democracy are distant here; more significant is a distinct appraisal of power padded by such notions as “liberal” and “moderate.” These are the necessary marketing tools for a political figure in exile.

The cleric’s movement, Hizmet, prides itself on sponsoring education and running programs heavy with the anti-radicalization agenda. His opponents, such as attorney Robert Amsterdam, retained by Ankara to investigate alleged financial misconduct in the United States, suggest that the movement’s leader “is a money-laundering criminal.”

Politics can be a dirty thing indeed, and in the case of Hizmet, education via some hundreds of charter schools in the United States has become an enterprise of channelling and re-directing to the Gülenistas.

This also has a further benefit: lobbying various levels of government within the United States, and funding trips to Turkey for no less than 200 congressmen, a clear violation of House of Representative rules. Influence, in short, is being assiduously cultivated.

An individual such as Erdogan is bound to be suspicious of mass education endeavours that favour a particular slant for the obvious reason that he has one himself. Hardly in the mould of a free-thinker, he is bound to see rival ideas as guns and bullets.

The failure of the coup has given the president a strong hand to press Washington on Gülen, who has come out of traditional obscurity to suggest how rich it was to be accused of leading a coup from abroad, “As someone who suffered under multiple military coups during the last five decades.” Sadly, those who suffer instability are not necessarily going to prevent it from recurring.

The attempt to drum up the case to the Obama administration is another feature of Turkey’s recent foreign policy: play the card of the stabilising power, be it in terms of quelling flows of refugees into the European Union, or stemming the forces of fundamentalism. This, despite a distinct ambivalence, if not actual tactical corporation at points with Islamic state officials. Fundamentalism does come in different shades.

As for what Ankara is seeking to adduce to prove the link to Gülen, the bar of evidence can be rather low. To justify the value of a fight, the enemy must always be inflated, credited with more influence and power than he necessarily has. Nothing is worse in revolutions and wars than the notion that one’s opponent was mediocre and incapable. The look in that mirror can prove most unenviable.

This strategy of inflation entails a ballooning approach on the part of the victor, one that has seen 20,000 government employees detained across various fields of employment. These include 185 admirals and colonels, and 1,500 finance ministry officials. Not even the prime minister’s office has been spared: 257 personnel have been let go. The smell of treason is wafting.

The coup plotters may certainly have drawn inspiration from Gülen in some form, alongside those traditional Kemalists who treat the Turkish constitution as the ultimate State fetish. The cleric’s Hizmet movement in Turkey is not to be taken lightly, and has been accused of winning supporters in the country’s judicial and military circles.

This has spilled over into a personalised flexing of muscle. In 2013, Erdogan took note of the efforts on the part of judicial officers in their efforts to bring corruption charges against officials within his inner circle, including son Bilal. By way of retaliation, Hizmet was confronted, its followers ostensibly removed from schools, and the officer corps and the police forces purged.

What we do have to go on in place of solid evidence on external plotting is a diet of overcooked rhetoric. Turkish Prime Minister Binali Yildirim has gone to the press to say that Washington has been supplied with details of the cleric’s “involvement” further adding on Saturday that any country standing by the exile “is no friend of Turkey [and] is engaged in a serious war with Turkey.” On Tuesday, the White House spokesman Josh Earnest revealed that Ankara had supplied the State Department with relevant material.

Much of Ankara’s policy towards its allies is ceremonial rather than substantive, but the point being made is important enough. Washington does not want a querulous NATO ally, one whose relationship will jeopardise the use of, for instance, bases in operations against Islamic State forces and the like.

On the other side of the ledger, assumptions that Gülen is encased in some moral white knight armour would also be misplaced. Political systems are mothers of necessity, breeding allies who may well in time become outcasts. Today’s outcasts can, in turn, become tomorrow’s autocrats.

History’s examples of moderate exiles, harboured in more tolerant waters, are few and far between. Had the coup succeeded, irrespective of whether Gülen’s hand was heavy or otherwise, the cauldron of Turkish politics may well have done something else. We may never know, though the hand of tyranny is rarely out of a job.

Source: International Policy Digest , July 20, 2016
v***@yahoo.com
2016-07-25 00:22:04 UTC
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http://hizmetnews.com/18230/turkey-coup-attempt-fethullah-gulen-cleric-accused-orchestrating-turmoil/#.V5VVomZTE2M

Turkey Coup Attempt: Who is Fethullah Gülen, The Cleric Being Accused Of Orchestrating The Turmoil?

Date posted: July 16, 2016

In an address to his supporters at Istanbul’s Ataturk airport early on Saturday, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan accused Fethullah Gülen — a cleric living in a self-imposed exile in the United States — of orchestrating the coup attempt against his government. Here’s what you need to know about Gülen, who has denied being involved in the coup, and his movement, known as the Gülen movement or Hizmet.

Who is Fethullah Gülen?

Gülen, 75, is a reclusive but influential Turkish cleric living in a self-imposed exile in Pennsylvania since 1999. He has often been called Turkey’s second most powerful man.

Gülen, who has penned more than 40 books and has often urged his followers to build schools instead of mosques, leads a popular movement — Hizmet — which calls for the establishment of a secular and democratic government in Turkey.

What is the Hizmet movement?

The word Hizmet literally means “the service.” Although it doesn’t have an official hierarchy or structure, it is still believed to be highly influential, with some reports suggesting that as much as 10 percent of the Turkish population supports the social and religious movement.

Although the movement has attracted support and praise across the world for its advocacy of interfaith dialogue — with the group now running a global network of businesses, think tanks and schools — some have, in the past, expressed fears that it may have an ulterior motive.

“We are troubled by the secretive nature of the Gülen movement, all the smoke and mirrors,” a senior U.S. official, speaking on the condition of anonymity, told the New York Times in 2012. “It is clear they want influence and power. We are concerned there is a hidden agenda to challenge secular Turkey and guide the country in a more Islamic direction.”

Why is Gülen being accused of orchestrating the coup attempt?

Turkey has a long history of rivalry between the Islamists — a group that includes Erdogan’s Justice and Development Party (AKP) — and the secularists — which includes many within the military who look to the ideas put forward by Turkish Republic’s founder Mustafa Kemal Ataturk for guidance. This has often put the Islamists in Turkey at odds with military, which has long considered itself as guardians of Kemalism.

Ideologically, Gülen’s movement, which emphasizes a moderate version of Sunni Islam, lies somewhere between the Islamists and the secularists. Gülen was an ally of Erdogan until 2013, when several anti-corruption allegations were levelled against supporters of Erdogan — who was the prime minister at the time.

Erdogan, convinced that the Gülenists were trying to unseat him, accused his one-time ally of being behind the corruption allegations. The festering rivalry between the two eventually culminated in a purge of perceived Gülenists in the police force, judiciary, media and the army.

Has Gülen responded to the accusations?

Yes. In a statement released Friday, the cleric condemned, “in the strongest terms,” the attempted coup in Turkey.

“Government should be won through a process of free and fair elections, not force,” Gülen said. “As someone who suffered under multiple military coups during the past five decades, it is especially insulting to be accused of having any link to such an attempt. I categorically deny such accusations.”

Alliance for Shared Values — a pro-Gülen group — also rejected the allegations, calling the comments made by Erdogan’s supporters “highly irresponsible.”

“For more than 40 years, Fethullah Gulen and Hizmet participants have advocated for, and demonstrated their commitment to, peace and democracy. We have consistently denounced military interventions in domestic politics. These are core values of Hizmet participants. We condemn any military intervention in domestic politics of Turkey,” the group said.

Source: International Business Times, July 16, 2016
v***@yahoo.com
2016-07-25 00:22:52 UTC
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http://hizmetnews.com/18214/man-living-pennsylvania-responsible-turkey-coup-attempt/#.V5VWFmZTE2M

Is man living in Pennsylvania responsible for Turkey coup attempt?

Date posted: July 15, 2016

ANKARA, Turkey — Low-flying military jets buzzed over Turkey’s capital of Ankara. Soldiers blocked major bridges in Istanbul. State-run television announced that the military had imposed martial law.

In an interview via FaceTime on CNN Turk television, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan blamed the coup on an international opposition network.

That movement, known as Hizmet, is led by Fethullah Gulen, a Turkish imam and Islamic scholar who has been living in Pennsylvania in the Saylorsburg area.

The Alliance for Shared Values, a nonprofit affiliated with Gulen, issued the following statement in response.


“For more than 40 years, Fethullah Gulen and Hizmet participants have advocated for, and demonstrated their commitment to, peace and democracy. We have consistently denounced military interventions in domestic politics. These are core values of Hizmet participants. We condemn any military intervention in domestic politics of Turkey.

Events on the ground are moving quickly and it would be irresponsible for us to speculate on them. We remain concerned about the safety and security of Turkish citizens and those in Turkey right now.

Comments by pro-Erdogan circles about the movement are highly irresponsible.”

Erdogan urged people to take to the streets against the military. He vowed to return Ankara. His location was unclear.

“This was done from outside the chain of command,” he said, adding that lower-ranking officers had rebelled against senior officers.

“In history, nowhere in the world has a coup been successful,” Erdogan added. “Sooner or later, they all fail.”

Meanwhile, thousands across Istanbul and Ankara began flooding the streets alongside military tanks.

Famously sensitive to criticism, Erdogan is no stranger to controversy. Here’s how he rose to power and divided a country.

The bitter divide over a leader

“So long as you love the people sincerely and deeply, people will love you,” Erdogan told CNN in March.

But the population is bitterly divided between citizens who love — or loathe — their president.

Along with deadly jihadist bombings and rising tensions with the country’s largest ethnic minority, Turkey is perhaps more internally politically polarized than ever.

Since the beginning of the Syrian uprising, Erdogan has used the conflict as an opportunity to crack down on the Kurdish Workers Party (PKK). The militant group has been battling the Turkish state for decades and is listed as a terrorist organization by NATO, the U.S. and the EU.

The strategy “stoked the fires of Kurdish grievances, and the PKK returned the favor in-kind — ratcheting up its terror attacks on the Turkish state, mainly against security institutions like the police, which have increased in number and frequency over the past five years,” according to Lina Khatib, head of the Middle East and North Africa Programme at Chatham House.

But Erdogan also benefited. He used the attacks to portray himself as the man protecting the nation from terrorism.

However, Erdogan’s image has been tarnished by strict internet censorship — Twitter, Facebook and YouTube are frequently blocked in Turkey — and the wholesale sacking of police officers and prosecutors who had investigated his government for corruption.

‘I’m not at war with the press’

In March, Erodgan’s critics accused him of launching a nationwide crackdown on dissent in the media — and society at large.

Turkish authorities seized control of the country’s largest newspaper earlier this year. Turkish journalists were tried for espionage after publishing a video allegedly showing the intelligence agency funneling weapons into Syria.

“I’m not at war with the press,” Erdogan insisted.

Insulting the president is a crime in Turkey. More than 1,800 cases have been filed since Erdogan took office in 2014, according to the country’s Justice Minister.

Turkey’s troubled relationship with the media has long been a point of contention for the European Union, which has said freedom of the press and of expression are nonnegotiable conditions for joining the EU. Erdogan has called these concerns “irrelevant obstacles.”

From prime minister to president

Erogan is the co-founder of Turkey’s ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP). He was elected prime minister in 2003. Under his rule, Turkey became a powerhouse in the Middle East. His reign came to an end in 2014, and his own party’s rules prevented him from seeking a fourth term. So, he ran for president — and won.

Before this, the president of Turkey was a largely ceremonial role, but Erdogan tried to change that by altering the constitution to give him more power.

The 2015 election resulted in a hung Parliament, leading to sweeping anti-government protests and terror attacks. Turkey held a snap election, and with that, Erdogan’s AK Party regained control.

Under Erdogan, who is extremely conservative, religion has started to play a more important role in Turkey, which is a largely secular country. He was active in Islamist circles in the 1970s and 1980s.

A champion of pious, working class Turks, Erdogan had until recently presided over a prolonged period of economic expansion.

But the heady days when Erdogan pushed reformist agenda and lobbied to win Turkey’s membership in the European Union have long faded.
v***@yahoo.com
2016-07-25 00:23:50 UTC
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http://hizmetnews.com/17937/erdogan-demonizes-peaceful-movement-international-community-applauds/#.V5VWZ2ZTE2M

While Erdogan Demonizes a Peaceful Movement, International Community Applauds Them.

Date posted: May 4, 2016


It is no secret that the corruption scandal on December 17, 2013 that encircled the Turkish government was one of the biggest threats to Erdogan’s rule since he took the office in 2003.


Since then, Erdogan has been accusing Mr. Fethullah Gulen and his movement of conspiring against him through a corruption graft and vociferously claiming that the Gulen movement is a terrorist organization.


By using the state power and judiciary, Erdogan illegally has taken over banks, media organizations, schools and even private properties and companies that are assumed to be linked to the movement. During the witch hunt, more than two thousand people were detained and hundreds of them imprisoned.


The recent 77 pages long, ‘Turkey Human Rights Report‘ by the State Department shed light on this abuse of state power and Government witch hunt, emphasizing and documenting that Turkish authorities used the anti-terror laws to detain individuals and seize assets, including media companies, of individuals alleged to be associated with the Gulen movement.


While Erdogan is demonizing the Gulen movement in Turkey and operating a witch hunt against Gulen affiliated media groups, charities, schools, hospitals, banks and corporations, US President Obama sent significant clear message to the Gulen-inspired “International Festival of Language and Culture” that took place in Washington DC at the DAR Constitution Hall, Washington DC’s largest Concert Hall on April, 28, 2016.


Mr. Obama’s message was read by his special representative. Many in Washington believe that this is an important indication of the perception of the Obama administration about Erdogan’s witchhunt against Gulen Movement.


Below is full text of his message.



THE WHITE HOUSE
Washington



‘The rich cultures and unique histories of our global society are brought to life through mesmerizing dance and captivating performance. In demonstrating the traditions that make your heritages special, festivals like this one allow us to bear witness to the ways hope and beauty stem from songs of inclusion. Your efforts to unite young people from across the globe reflect the power our common humanity has to transcend what sets us apart.

As you come together to celebrate the cultural mosaic that is our world and forge bonds of friendship, I wish you all the best.’



Meanwhile, The General Secretary of United Nations, Ban Ki-Moon, has also sent a message to the ‘International Festival on Language and Culture’ that also took place at NY Headquarters on Saturday. Below is the message of General Secretary of U.N, Mr. Ban Ki-moon.




MESSAGE TO INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL ON LANGUAGE AND CULTURE



New York, 29 April 2016


‘I am delighted to greet the International Festival on Language and Culture. I commend the Peace Islands Institute for making this meeting possible and bringing young people from 27 countries together to discuss and celebrate our cultural and linguistic diversity.

Your gathering today takes place as the world embarks on implementing the newly adopted 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development — a people-centered, planet-friendly blueprint for shared global progress. Culture has immense power to contribute to the transformative change that is at the heart of the new agenda. However, transformation should not come at the expense of respect
for cultural and linguistic heritage and diversity. Here at the United Nations, multilingualism allows us to work cooperatively to improve the state of the world. A United Nations essay contest — ‘Many Languages, One World’ — undertaken in partnership with ELS Education Services, invited students to write about the newly adopted Sustainable Development Goals in an official United Nations language that is not their mother tongue or medium of educational instruction. We have received thousands of entries from 165 countries, and the winners will speak at the United Nations in July. The contest reflects our conviction that the effort taken to acquire a language wholly different to one’s own is an investment not only in yourself, but also in global
understanding. You are part of the largest generation of young people in the world’s history, with wide-ranging opportunities to connect and engage. Wherever you live or whatever your chosen pursuit, the world needs you to show allegiance to the wider common good. I look
forward to your global citizenship and urge you to keep using your passion for culture and languages to build a more compassionate world.’
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